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. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere
conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of pr
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
announcement that makes sports a civil right for students. >> it's a good looking sky out there. it's a little cold. okay, it's down right bitterly cold this morning. and we're going to get more snow. we'll get the latest weather and traffic from tucker and julie next. still pretty. 7:08. we'll be right back.  >>> pentagon chief panetta makes it official opening combat positions to women. they should have to meet the same standard as men. panetta says the qualifications for women will not be lowered and spoke of the increased opportunity for female warriors. >> as we all know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> some roles in the special forces like navy seals and the army's delta force may take longer to open up. defense officials say military chiefs have until may 15th to report on their implementation plans. >>> u.s. schools are bracing for sweeping changes. education department says students with disabilities deserve a fair shot to play on traditional sports team. today officials will is
at weather. tony and allison, back out to you guys. >> all right. tucker, thank you so much. >> today is the national holiday honoring dr. martin luther king jr.. a wreath ceremony was held on sunday for the civil right's leader. among the dignataries on hand, jesse jackson, jamie foxx and chris tucker. the dr. king inauguration weekend, an intersection of history. >> the first family's busy day has already begun. the president, the first lady and their two daughters left for church at saint john's. >> sarah simmons has our coverage from the other end of pennsylvania avenue and tell us what we can expect to see. she's overlooking the parade reviewing stand at lafayette park. >> reporter: that's right. we're here right behind me is where the president will be sitting to view the parade as it comes through. here you can already see we have a lot of people already showing up taking their spot here to watch the parade as well. what a wonderful place to be able to watch it. his president will be in his glass enclosed heated area viewing the parades. it wasn't until the late 1800s actually
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
americans through the sif rights era and -- the civil rights era and how special a day is this inauguration that it's falling on the official day of martin luther king. >> god must have preplanned that. i didn't get it at first. then all of a sudden i said it's dr. king's birthday, the day we're going to celebrate. so it's been a wonderful day. i had the opportunity to post a lot of pictures of obama and dr. king on my website and do some things, have conversations with people about the struggle as well as how did -- or how they feel about obama becoming president and how they feel about him winning a second time around. >> what are you hearing? >> people are really, really pleased about that. in washington, d.c. of course, you know, this is a democratic town. we were so happy that the democrats won one more time. so i'm personally real pleased by that. >> one of the things people started to jump to conclusions, we're in a post-racial society right now. and we heard the conversation moving forward we still have a long way to go but he was elected a second time. that has to be another step i
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
also told me -- tell me about your struggle and the sif civil rights movement and because went -- and what you went through. >> i went to an integrated school. i was one of the first blacks going to the high school in texas. >> reporter: you're a trailblazer and bringing your group back again this year. >> bringing them back. >> reporter: and a little easier this time. >> easier getting in. >> reporter: tell me you where stayed last time? >> last time we had to go to delaware. this time we're staying in alexandria, virginia. >> reporter: they're right in old town. you have a great spot and the charpter bus has driven them here this morning. -- charter bus has driven them here this morning. you'll be watching on the jumbotrons. >> that's right. we'll be watching. >> reporter: patty, thank you so much from tyler texas coming up to watch the second inauguration of president obama. >> thank you so much. >> reporter: have a great time. >> okay. bye-bye. >> reporter: bye-bye. i'm wondering how many folks are coming back for a second time. that's very interesting. she's got a whole bu
this is a civil rights issue of now, of today, and we need to make it the civil rights issue and really talk about what's involved, the lives that are involved. >> and i just want to make it clear, you're anti-abortion rights, that's right? >> that's correct, yes. >> just to follow-up to that first question about why the poll numbers have risen and the number of people who support abortion rights. during the election, as you know, todd akin, richard mourdock, two men running for federal office said some unwise things perhaps about race and abortion. do you think that kind of hurt your cause? >> oh, i'm sure it did, and we had -- those clips were run over and over and over and over again and there's no way that that did not affect public opinion. it's unfortunate. i think both of those candidates have very good pro life voting records. what they said was simply unfortunate. they clearly did not know how to communicate what it is that they believe and why they believe it and i think that it became a huge liability for them costing them both of their races. >> now the other side would say, you know,
and malcolm x were certainly huge and symbolic leaders of the civil rights movement. they were not friendly in life. but their two widows forged an intensely deep friendship. and i don't think a lot of people know that. >> right. i didn't know, either. that's what drew me to the story. the fact that they were friends. and they look at the bigger picture to, you know, live out their husbands' legacies to keep the dream alive, so to speak. and they didn't fight. they just -- >> because martin was peaceful to gandhi. and malcolm x., fiery. you know, by any means necessary. so, you know, whatever public was attracted to, you had y you sides you could go to. but they lived beyond that. >> exactly. the two women actually forged a really deep and intimate bond, not the least of which, they were both widows. they both lost their husbands violently. >> they had that deeply in common. they had families to raise. they were committed to the movement, and to the community, and to the struggle, i think to the larger issues. so, they were to get past it what was considered petty. >> single mothers. raised
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
. the church of scientology was founded in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members paid to take courses designed to help them work through issues of their past and reach a higher state of consciousne consciousness. church members are tested with a device that is used to monitor their feelings and reactions. hubbard died in 1986 and since then this man has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church. an order that is responsible for church management. members sometimes wear naval style uniforms and dedicate their life to the church promises to remain in the church for reincarnated lives to come. it claims that 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis put it this way. >> he's responsible for the current renaissance the church is experiencing and the church has doubled in size in the last five years and flourished under his leadership. >> according
rights and environment. that's a huge take away. the third particular away his lecturing about the need for civility. and that's after the nastyiest race in politics. the media didn't point that out. stuart: this fawning acceptance of everything the president had to say yesterday, the media is the not pointing out financial peril. this is a financial program, you know that. we follow the money. if i follow the money trail down the road and we need to pay for the entitlements and spending and taxation coming at us, we have a slow economy, and a dangerous escalation in our debt. and i don't think the media is doing its job because nobody is saying it. >> they were too busy gushing, that's the problem. al roker frantically waving from the sidelines and wolf blitzer frantically trying to get his attention. this isn't reporting, serious journalism or a look at the issues of the day. they were attacking george bush for the cost of his inaugural before the inauguration, they were attacking him. there's no serious coverage of this man. the media are his absolute pompon wavers in this administra
. ron hubbard in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members payto take courses designed to help them work through issues from their past and reach a higher state of consciousness. to understand what's holding them back, church members are tested with a device called an e-meter that's used to monitor their feelings and reactions. l. ron hubbard died in 1986, and since then this man, david miscavige, has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church, an order that is responsible for church management called the sea organization. members of sea-org sometimes wear naval-style uniforms. they dedicate their lives to the church, signing billion-year contracts, promising to remain in the church for many reincarnated lives to come. the church of scientology says it's opened some 170 churches around the globe and claims 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis
there is nothing they can do. >> it isn't criminal. at this point it's a civil matter between the owner of the property, who is bank of america, and the people who are occupying it right now. >> barbosa was unavailable for an interview but on his facebook page says, a successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him. i have failed over and over and over again in my life, and that is why i succeed. >> he's simply taken advantage of the fact that the mortgage foreclosure system, if you will, in the state of florida is inundated with foreclosures, and these plaintiffs, these banks and lenders, don't have the manpower to address each individual piece of property. >> reporter: assuming the bank does not step forward, under florida law, the mansion could be barbosa's if he maintains the house and pays the taxes for the next seven years. in a statement, bank of america says it's aware of neighbors' concerns, adding, there is a certain legal process we are required by law to follow, and we have filed the appropriate action. the bank is taking this si
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)